Introduction to ICN

The Indiana College Network (ICN) provides a single starting point for learners interested in locating educational opportunities from Indiana’s accredited colleges and universities and educational partners.

ICN Services

  • A searchable, online catalog of credit and noncredit college, high-school, and professional-development courses.
  • A searchable, online catalog of degree and certificate programs available entirely at a distance—associate, bachelor’s, bachelor’s completion, master’s, doctorate, licensure, endorsement, and certificate plus a high school diploma.
  • Learner support and assistance through an online inquiry system and a toll-free hotline.
  • A Web site rich in information to help distant learners succeed.
  • A special section on the Web site about opportunities for high-school students—advanced electives, dual credit classes, and early college enrollment.
  • Regular updates on new programs and classes of interest.
  • Referrals to programs at partner institutions.
  • Facilitation of interinstitutional registration.

ICN staff can answer your questions about distance education, help you register for classes, and provide information about careers and financial aid. They can also connect you with the right campus offices to help you apply for admission or plan a program of study. And if you need access to equipment or the Internet to take your classes, ICN staff can also guide you to a learning center near you.

Distance Learning Basics

You don’t have to live near a campus to attend class or complete your degree when Indiana colleges and universities offer thousands of classes at a distance each semester via the Internet, CD-ROMs/DVDs, videoconference, videotape, and traditional correspondence. Several institutions offer certificate, undergraduate, and graduate degree programs at a distance. The courses are virtually the same as those taught on campus except that a physical distance separates the teacher and you.

What should I expect?
When you register for a distance education course, you should expect equivalent content and opportunity for learning as students who take the course on campus. Distance education courses are not easy, fast-paced replacements for regular on-campus classes. In fact, distance education requires self motivation and a serious approach to learning because much of the work is done individually without the in-person instructor guidance in traditional learning environments. However, instructors are available to answer your questions by phone, e-mail, or even by an on-campus orientation meeting or a videoconference.

Is distance learning right for me?
Only you can determine whether distance education is right for you. Successful distance learners are self-disciplined, self-motivated, and do not require regular reminders from their instructor or classmates to meet deadlines.

Is Distance Learning for me?
How well will distance learning fit your circumstances and life-style? Can you use a computer and browse the Internet with relative ease, or are there things you have to learn, will adjustments need to be made for you to handle their use? The above handy nine question quiz was developed by the Kansas State University Division of Continuing Education to help potential distance education students assess their chances for success.

How well will distance learning fit your circumstances and life-style?
Distance learning can be a wonderful alternative to students who do not have the time or ability to get to a campus classroom; but distance and online courses are not for everyone. Before enrolling in an online course, take the quiz above developed and used by Old Dominion University to help you assess whether online learning is right for you.

What kind of learner are you?
Three commonly recognized learning styles are visual, auditory, and kinesthetic. In general, people use all three, but most individuals favor one style over the others. If you are familiar with your own learning style, you will be able to study more effectively and reach your educational goals.

  • Visual learners process new information by reading and watching. These learners relate best to written information, notes, diagrams, and pictures. Seeing a teacher's body language and facial expressions often helps them understand a lecture's content. They may think in pictures and learn best from visual displays and handouts. Visual learners may take detailed notes during a lecture because it helps them absorb the information.
  • Auditory learners process new information by hearing. They learn best through lectures and discussions. Often, information written down is confusing and has little meaning until it is heard. It may help auditory learners to use a tape recorder or read written information out loud.
  • Kinesthetic learners process new information by imitation and practice. They relate best to a hands-on approach, actively exploring the physical world around them. They may also find it difficult to sit still for long periods and may become distracted by their need for activity and exploration.

How do I begin?
Begin by thinking about your educational goals. Do you want to take one distance education class or complete an entire degree online? If you are degree-seeking, have you found a program that meets your need? If so, contact the ICN campus coordintor at the institution where you will seek your degree. Your ICN campus coordinator is your best resource for information on studying at a distance.

How do I take distance classes?
Classes are offered through a variety of delivery methods, including the Internet, videoconferencing, cable/public television, videotape, and traditional print correspondence. Some courses are offered in multiple delivery modes, while others may use a combination of methods for a single course.

What do I do if I need access to special equipment to take my class?
There are more than 50 public learning centers throughout the state that provide access to the technology distance learners need to complete their assignments and communicate with their instructors. Many are located on college and university campuses, although the number of centers located in public libraries, public high schools, and community centers is growing. Learning center coordinators have experience helping distance students conquer their challenges. If they don’t know the answer to your questions, they have the resources to find it for you.

Find a learning center

Can I apply for admission online?
Yes. Whether you are degree-seeking or not, you can apply for admission online on the ICN Web site.

Online Admission Forms for Degree Seekers

Apply for Nondegree Admission (requires an ICN login and password)

How do I register?
If you are planning to take courses that originate solely from your Home Institution, then register directly with your Home Institution. If you would like to take a course from an ICN partner institution, you will need to logon and/ or create an ICN account to preregister.

How do I get my books and course materials?
Once your registration is approved, the Originating Institution will either mail your books and course materials to you or instruct you how to obtain them. Many institutions make it possible to order your books online, while others take orders over the telephone.

What resources are available to help me succeed?
In addition to your ICN campus coordinator, staff at ICN can point you to online resources as well as to your local learning center, where you will be able to access equipment needed to complete your assignments and talk with coordinators who have experience helping distance learners succeed.

New to College

More and more adults are entering college. Whether it’s for career promotion, career change, or personal enrichment, if you are new to college and are considering distance education, the following tips will help you get started.

  • What is your goal?
    It's a good idea to know where you're going before you start. Do you want to begin a degree program or are you looking to take a few courses for career promotion or change? Perhaps you want to learn simply for the pleasure of learning?
  • Are you comfortable using technology?
    Because distance education courses are delivered via technology, such as the Internet, videoconferencing, and CD-ROMs/DVDs, you should be confident in your technical abilities.
  • Are you an independent learner?
    Distance education students must be self motivated and comfortable working alone, because most of the learning is done independently.
  • Learn higher education terminology.
    In order to conduct transactions or contact the right office, it's essential that you understand common higher education definitions. What is a registrar? What does a bursar do?

Glossary of Terms

Get to know the people at your Home Institution.
The staff at your Home Institution are your best resources for assistance as a distance learner. They are dedicated to helping you succeed, and can link you to useful campus offices or services to assist you.

Advising is essential.
If you plan to pursue a degree, it is extremely important to obtain academic advising from your Home Institution before registering for any courses. The academic advisor at your Home Institution is an expert in your program of study and knows the courses you need to complete a degree or certificate. Without an academic advisor, you could easily register for a course that won't count toward your program. Your academic advisor may also be able to suggest alternative classes that you can take as replacements for degree requirements. If you need a specific course to finish your program, your academic advisor can approve your taking a class from another ICN partner, without jeopardizing your financial aid.

Academic Advising

You're not in this alone.
Distant students have a variety of resources to help them achieve their educational goals. In addition to your ICN campus coordinator, your classmates and instructors, and ICN staff will walk you through registration and admission procedures, point you useful online resources, and direct you to a local learning center where you'll find coordinators who have experience helping distance learners succeed.

Is distance learning right for you?
Only you can determine whether distance education is right for you. Successful distance learners are self-disciplined, self-motivated, and do not require regular reminders from the instructor or classmates to meet deadlines. Perhaps one of the following quizzes will help you decide.

Is Distance Learning for me?
How well will distance learning fit your circumstances and life-style? The above handy questionnaire was developed to help potential distance education students assess their chances for success and is used at Northern Virginia Community College’s Extended Learning Institute. This brief quiz should help you to determine if distance learning is right for you, too.

How well will distance learning fit your circumstances and life-style?
Distance learning can be a wonderful alternative to students who do not have the time or ability to get to a campus classroom; but distance and online courses are not for everyone. Before enrolling in an online course, take the quiz above developed and used by Old Dominion University to help you assess whether online learning is right for you.

Returning to College?

Congratulations on your decision to go back to school! Whatever your reason for returning to school, distance education offers a flexible and convenient option for those with family and work responsibilities. If you have been out of school for more than a year, the tips below will help you get started.

  • Review your previous college experience.
    Do you plan to continue the same program of study or are you planning to change your major? Would you benefit from a refresher course before starting?
  • What do you want to achieve?
    It's a good idea to know where you're going before you start. Do you want to complete a degree or certificate program or are you looking to take a few courses for career promotion? Perhaps you want to learn simply for personal enrichment? If you are undecided, consider taking a few courses as a nondegree student until you decide which major or plan of study you want to follow. Be advised that some colleges and universities may require you to repeat courses taken more than 10 years ago.
  • Is your program of study available at a distance?
    The ICN Program Catalog provides a complete listing of all degree, certificate, licensure, and endorsement programs offered entirely at a distance, complete with plans of study so you can see what is expected in each program. If you would like to know more about the courses involved, the ICN Course Catalog also provides detailed information on every distance education course, including delivery methods and prerequisites.

Search ICN Program Catalog

  • Are you comfortable using technology?
    Because distance education courses are delivered via technology, such as the Internet, CD-ROMs/DVDs, and videoconferencing, you need to be confident of your abilities to use the required technology. You might find an introductory computer class at your local library or learning center helpful.
  • Are you an independent learner?
    Distance education students must be self-motivated and comfortable working alone, because most of the learning is done independently.
  • What about your finances?
    Are you planning to pay out-of-pocket for your courses or will you be looking for other sources of funding to finance your education?

Financial Aid

Advising is essential.
If you are pursuing a degree, or expect to be, it is extremely important to obtain academic advising from your Home Institution before registering. The academic advisor at your Home Institution is an expert in your program of study and knows the courses you need to complete a degree or certificate. Without an academic advisor, you could easily register for a course that won't count toward your program. Your academic advisor may also be able to suggest alternative classes that you can take as replacements for degree requirements. If you need a specific course to finish your program, your academic advisor can approve your taking a class from another ICN partner, without jeopardizing your financial aid.

Academic Advising

Is distance learning right for you?
Only you can determine whether distance education is right for you. Successful distance learners are self-disciplined, self-motivated, and do not require regular reminders from the instructor or classmates to meet deadlines. Perhaps one of the following quizes will help you decide.

Distance Learning Quiz
This self-test may help you decide if distance education courses are a good option for you. Provided by the Northern Virginia Community College.

Distance Learning Quiz for Prospective Distance Learners
This self-test is designed to help determine how distance education would fit your needs. Provided by Washington State University.

Credit for Life Experience

Adult students often bring a great deal of knowledge with them when they decide to get a college degree. Through prior learning assessment, some college continuing education offices may award credit to students for their past life experiences as well as past formal education.

Colleges and universities use "prior learning assessments" to evaluate the knowledge a student has gained through life experience. Prior learning assessment enables college instructors to evaluate life experiences as potentially equivalent to courses taught at the college level. There are three common ways in which prior learning can be assessed: prior learning portfolios, standardized tests, and departmental credit. Colleges have high standards for these assessments, so students should check before investing their time to see which of these options, if any, their college or university will consider.

Prior Learning Portfolio
A prior learning portfolio is a written record presented by the student requesting college credit for learning outside the classroom. Credit is given only for college-level learning, and the portfolio must be well documented and organized. Portfolio requirements vary, but most of them include the following elements:

      • Identification and definition of specific prior learning for which college credit is being requested.
      • An essay or narrative explaining how this prior learning related to the student's desired degree program, from what experiences it was gained, and how it fits into the student's overall education and career plans.
      • Documentation that the student has actually acquired the learning he is claiming.
      • A credit request listing exactly how much credit the student expects in each subject area. Some colleges offer guidelines or courses to assist students who are preparing a prior learning portfolio. Some classes are required as part of preparing a prior learning portfolio.

Standardized Tests
Standardized tests are nationally administered exams created to evaluate students and compare knowledge levels. Each college and university has its own standards for accepting tests, defining a passing grade and awarding hours of credit. Some schools may have a limit on the number of credits that can be awarded through exams. Others will not grant credit but will allow the student to bypass an introductory class or classes and begin at a higher level.

      • College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
        Offered through College Board, CLEP is a series of exams covering general subjects. The five general exams cover mathematics, English composition, humanities, natural science, and social science and history. Another type of CLEP exam is the subject exam. A subject exam covers specific subjects typically taught in undergraduate courses having similar names. Students may be able to obtain 3-12 hours of credit per general exam for a passing score. Books on exam preparation with sample tests can be found in bookstores, libraries, and on the Internet.

      • Graduate Record Exam (GRE)
        The GRE is normally required for students entering graduate school. However, it is sometimes used to assess prior learning at the undergraduate level. There are two types of tests available through the GRE. One is a general test that measures skills acquired over a long period of time that are not related to any specific field of study. The other type is a subject test that measures achievement in particular fields of study. The general test is offered through computer-based or paper-based testing. The subject test is only offered through paper-based testing.

      • Job Ready Assessments
        Job Ready Assessments are often used to obtain credit or advanced standing in vocational and technical fields. They are used to measure knowledge and how that knowledge is applied. Job Ready Assessments are based on national standards and include a written and performance assessment. Approximately 75 Job Ready Assessments are available. Students should call 1.800.334.6283 to find a testing center.

      • Defense Activity for Nontraditional Educational Support (DANTES)
        Students who have served in the military may obtain college credit through DANTES. DANTES is used by colleges and universities to award credit to students who can demonstrate knowledge of subjects commonly taught in introductory college courses. It provides a testing program, an evaluation system for military technical training and a system for documenting learning experiences gained through military services. DANTES also provides approximately 100 proficiency exams free of charge to military personnel and helps them gain college credit through the use of a prior learning portfolio.

Departmental Credit
To earn departmental credit, students work with a specific department (rather than the college's admission office) at the college of their choice. Credit obtained through a department is generally for a specific course or field, such as foreign language or math. Each department will create its own exam to test the student, so it is particularly important for the student to talk with the instructor or department chair to find out how long the exam will be, what subjects will be covered, how much credit might be awarded and if there is a specific text or content area the student should study. Two common kinds of departmental credit options are the challenge exam and oral exam.

      • Challenge Examinations
        If students feel they already have the knowledge taught in a particular course, such as foreign language or advanced mathematics, they can "challenge" the course. Challenge examinations are unique to a college and a department. A faculty member may design the exam around lectures and assigned textbooks. For this reason, it is important to talk to the instructor before taking a challenge exam. The instructor may make the syllabus and reading list available to the student.

      • Oral Exams
        Oral exams review a student's understanding of a subject. Oral exams consist of an interview with a faculty member or members and may involve either a discussion of the topic or a list of previously prepared questions. Exam material tends to be based on the course the instructor is teaching, and students should discuss this option with an advisor before choosing to take an oral exam.

For more information, contact your ICN Campus Coordinator.

Paying for College

Paying for college is a major expense, however there are many resources to help you, from the resources on this Web site to staff in financial aid offices on college and university campuses. Be advised that your family's financial situation will directly affect the types and amount of assistance you may receive.

      • Paying Out-of-Pocket
        Financial aid may not be an option for families at the higher end of the income scale. If you plan to pay for college yourself, start saving early. When the time comes, if you need financial assistance, you may qualify for need-based financial aid, low-rate student loans, and merit-based aid.
      • Need- and Merit-Based Financial Aid
        Need-based financial aid programs look solely at your financial information and personal circumstances, and generally consist of grants that do not need to be repaid. These grants may be awarded by federal and state governments, individual colleges and universities, and through private sources. Scholarships are generally merit-based, awarded by a college, university, or external source for academics, abilities, and talents regardless of your financial situation. The types and amounts of scholarships vary, and may represent a combination of both financial and merit-based needs.
      • Student Employment
        Student employment is money that students work for as part of their financial aid. Called "College Work-Study," this type of aid is generally determined by financial need and consists of part-time employment on- or off-campus.
      • Loans
        Loans are money that you borrow from a financial institution or a university for your education that you have to pay back with interest. Two types of loans are available—subsidized and unsubsidized. Subsidized loans are determined by financial need; unsubsidized loans are not. You are eligible to apply for a number of loan programs to help finance your education.

To be considered for any financial aid, other than unsubsidized loans, you must first complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) with the U.S. Department of Education. The U.S. Department of Education must receive this annual application by March 10 each academic year that you wish to be considered for aid. After the application has been processed, the U.S. Department of Education will send you a Student Aid Report (SAR). The information on the SAR will allow your college's financial aid office to award loans, grants, scholarships, and employment opportunities. The types and amount of financial aid available will vary by institution.

Related Links

Tips for Success

Studying at a distance can be challenging, however, with a positive attitude and dedication to your studies, you can achieve your educational goals. The tips below will help you get started.

      • Internet searching skills are essential.
        Having the ability to search quickly and effectively on the Internet is essential. To learn effective research methods, see Online Research under Learner Resources at the left. If you need assistance citing online references, see Writing/Communication Skills under Learner Resources.
      • Be comfortable with written communication.
        Because nearly all communication is written in the virtual classroom, you will be writing quickly and often. If you have limited writing abilities or are uncomfortable expressing yourself in writing, work on improving these skills before or as part of your online experience. Purdue University has an Online Writing Lab (OWL) that offers tutorials, workshops, study materials, conversations groups, a grammar hotline, and more.
      • Be self-motivated.
        Because there is freedom and flexibility in the distance education environment, you need to be responsible and self-disciplined. Distance education requires a commitment. Be prepared to spend as much time per week as the course requires—usually 12 to 15 hours per week per course.
      • Take control of your learning experience.
        There are many resources available to help you succeed, both on the ICN Web site and at your Home Institution. It is up to you to take ownership of your learning experience.
      • Get your own email address and check your mail frequently.
        Email is the most common way to communicate with your instructor(s), your advisor, your ICN campus coordinator, and other students. If you do not currently have your own email account, free accounts may be obtained from www.yahoo.com, www.excite.com, and www.hotmail.com. Most colleges and universities provide their students with a free email address; however, you will still need to obtain a local Internet Service Provider (ISP). If you don't have Internet access at home or at your place of work, you can use the equipment at your local learning center or library.
      • Advising is important.
        Without an academic advisor to review your plan of study and the courses you have taken so far, you could accidentally register for a course that won't count toward your program. Only your academic advisor can verify which specific courses will meet your degree requirements. If you are in need of an academic advisor, contact the ICN campus coordinator at your Home Institution.
      • Registration dates vary.
        Registration dates and deadlines for distance education courses do not always coincide with registration dates for on-campus courses. Be sure to check the ICN Registration Time Tables prior to registering each semester.
      • The drop/withdrawal policy of your Home Institution always applies.
        When taking a course that originates from an ICN institution other than your Home Institution, the drop/add/withdrawal policies of your Home Institution always apply.
      • Participation is vital to your success.
        Keeping up with your assignments and participating in your courses is vital to your success. Distance education courses have the same requirements as on-campus courses, and attendance may play a role in your final grade.
      • Notify your instructor about any problems you encounter.
        If you have problems with course content or the technology, notify your instructor so you can get the assistance you need to complete your course. Be sure to fill out the SUBJECT line in your email so your instructor will know the urgency of your communication. Allow a reasonable amount of time for your instructor to respond. And be sure to notify your instructor promptly of changes in your email address and/or telephone number.
      • If you need assistance, just ask.
        Just as campus-based students have access to support services, as a distant learner, you have a variety of resources, including your instructor, ICN campus coordinator, and ICN staff who can point you to online resources as well as to a local learning center, where you will find coordinators who have experience helping distant learners.

Glossary of Terms

admission
entry to a particular institution or program that is formally granted by the institution after a student meets set requirements

advisor/advising
person or act of directing a student toward the proper courses necessary to complete the student's educational goals

asynchronous communication or interaction
any act of exchanging information involving a delay between the sending and the receiving of the message/p>

associate degree
degree program requiring 60+ hours of specified course work

bachelor's degree or baccalaureate
the degree of bachelor of arts or bachelor of science, typically requiring 120 hours of specified course work

bursar
campus office where student tuition and fee payments are made

campus
physical location of a college or university

campus coordinator
an ICN learner's primary contact at the Home Institutionan who assists with registration and provides on-campus support

correspondence course
a course in which all communication between student and instructor is done with printed materials via the US Mail

credit course
a class with specified learning goals which the student is required to meet in order to pass the course and that may be applied toward the fulfillment of degree requirements at a college or university

degree program
an organized sequence of classes that leads to the awarding of a college degree at the undergraduate or graduate level

delivery method
means by which a course is accessible to the student; can be television at a Receive Site, cable, videotape, via the Internet, or by U.S. mail

distance education
a formal learning activity which occurs when students and instructor are separated by geographic distance or by time, often supported by communications technology such as television, videotape, computers or mail

drop/withdrawal
student option for not continuing enrollment in a course. Student receives a full or partial refund of tuition and fees if the drop or withdrawal is completed by a certain date near the beginning of the semester

electronic mail (email)
a system of exchanging messages by means of computers attached to a network

electronic mail account or email account
an authorization that allows the sending of electronic mail messages over a particular system, such as one college's network

faculty
instructors of higher education course work; a group term: one college teacher is "a member of the faculty"

fees/costs
payment required for itemized services or materials involved with higher education classes

final exams
tests often given at the end of a course to assess mastery of course material

financial aid
money available from various sources and under various conditions to students needing assistance to pay tuition and educational expenses. The term covers both grants and loans.

graduate course
a credit course that may be applied to a graduate degree (that is, a master's or other professional degree, usually requiring at least 30 hours of work beyond the bachelor's degree)

Home Institution
the university or college in Indiana that processes your enrollment, maintains your records, issues your grades and grants credit, provides financial aid services, and grants your degree if you are degree seeking.

Indiana College Network (ICN)
a collaborative distance education service with participation from all of Indiana's accredited public colleges and unviersities and a growing number of private institutions that delivers educational courses and programs to learners at a distance

Indiana Partnership for Statewide Education (IPSE)
a cooperative venture formed in 1992 by Indiana's colleges and universities to deliver and support high-quality instructional programming for students wherever they are

Indiana Higher Education Telecommunication System (IHETS)
a state-supported consortium of all higher education institutions in Indiana that operates and manages telecommunication networks and services for shared use in addition to operating the Indiana College Network

IHETS Receive Site
location equipped to receive televised distance education courses over the IHETS satellite network; students can view and participate in televised classes at these locations.

IHETS Television
a closed-circuit satellite network transmitting distance education courses from colleges and universities to students throughout Indiana and beyond

(note: As of June 2006 IHETS Television is no longer an active delivery method)

IHETS Interactive / Web Conferencing
IHETS Interactive is a Web-based application that supports live video and audio as well as other types of interaction and collaboration. Students watch and listen to the instructor using a standard Windows PC and interact with the instructor and one another using the application’s audio and text chat features. IHETS Interactive classes can be taken at any location with a networked PC meeting the minimum technical requirements, including from home or work. Students who do not have regular access to a networked computer can participate from an authorized ICN learning center.

independent study
courses delivered and completed primarily via US mail

Internet
the web of interconnections among computers that allow computer users to exchange electronic mail and access host computers at a distance, including host computers providing sites on the World Wide Web ("WWW" or "Web")

IPSE Member Institutions (not the same as ICN Participating Institutins)

      • Ball State University
      • Independent Colleges of Indiana
      • Indiana State University
      • Indiana University
      • Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana
      • Purdue University
      • University of Southern Indiana
      • Vincennes University

learning center
a place where students can use equipment and obtain services needed to participate in distance education classes, including computers and fax machines

learning center coordinator
individual at a Learning Center who provides information about learning opportunities, access to equipment, instruction in its use, and general help with course-related or program-related service needs, questions, and problems

library coordinator
a librarian at a college or university who provides library services and resources to distance education students taking courses originating from that institution

live interaction
ability for students to participate in classes offered at a distance using electronic technology (video or audio return communication for a TV class or "chat" mode on the Internet)

noncredit
a class that typically meets only once or just a few times and that contributes toward personal or occupational development rather than being applicable toward a college degree

open enrollment
courses which allow students to register at any time throughout the year. Open enrollment courses generally must be completed within a six month or one year period, depending upon the originating institution

Originating Institution
the college or university which produces and offers a specific course

parallel course
course that must be taken the same semester as another for full credit

prerequisite
requirements necessary before a student can take a particular class

professional development
courses offered to improve knowledge and skills in a specific professional areas, such as professional certification programs

registrar's office

campus office where student registration and records are compiled

registration
act wherein a student enrolls in a specific course

student services
services for students and prospective students, including counseling and help with course registration )

syllabus
outline of material a specific course will cover, on what schedule, with what assignments; usually distributed at the first class of the semester (plural: syllabi).

Teleresponse
a special device developed by IHETS for the satellite network to allow off-site, distant students to interact with the instructor and classmates via return audio communication

transferability
the extent to which a course taken from one campus may be accepted by another campus; variations determining full or partial transfer of the credit depend on such factors as whether the receiving campus offers an equivalent or similar course at comparable levels of academic expectation for learning; academic advisors and campus coordinators have information about whether and how specific courses will transfer to their institutions and degree programs

transcript
student record of grades, courses completed, and advancement toward a degree or toward the completion of a program

tuition
payment required for enrollment in a course

undergraduate course
a credit course that may be applied to an undergraduate degree (that is, a two-year college degree, often referred to as an associate degree, or a four-year college degree, often referred to as a bachelor's degree)

Virtual Indiana Classroom (VIC)
delivery method of the Indiana University Virtual Indiana Classroom network. The two-way video courses delivered via the IU interactive network are available solely at IU campuses

World Wide Web (WWW or Web)
an information system based on hypertext, in which you can follow links from one document to another; the millions of documents which make up the Web are located on computers all over the world and can be accessed via the Internet

Checklist For Distance Students

If you are new to distance education and plan to take courses through the ICN Interinstitutional Registration process, the following checklist will help walk you through the process.

      1. Select a Home Institution and Apply for Admission—Your Home Institution is the Indiana college or university that will maintain your academic records, process your financial aid, and confer your degree if you are degree-seeking.
      2. Apply for Financial Aid, if Needed—Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by March 10 each year that you want to be considered for federal or state financial aid. Check with your Home Institution financial aid office to find out what kinds of aid might be available to you. Don’t forget to check with your employer for any tuition assistance plans.
      3. Select your Class(es) from the ICN Course Catalog—The ICN Course Catalog is the most up-to-date resource for course availability. Be sure to note any special requirements for equipment, testing, or course prerequisites.
      4. Consult with an Academic Advisor at Your Home Institution—Your Academic Advisor can verify which courses will meet your specific degree requirements; they can also complete an ICN Credit Transfer Agreement to make sure that courses you want to take from another ICN Originating Institution will be accepted not only by your Home Institution, but also by your particular program.
      5. Select a Learning Center, if Needed—Learning Centers provide support for students studying at a distance in addition to access to computers, the Internet, email, library services, or fax machines for course-related communications.
      6. Register for Your Courses—If you are registering for courses that originate soley from your Home Institution, register directly with your Home Institution. To register for courses from other ICN participating institutions, create an ICN Account and log in to preregister. Your registration request will be processed by ICN and forwarded to your Home Institution. Your Home Institution will contact you to confirm your registration.
      7. Purchase BooksOnce your registration is approved, the Originating Institution will either mail your books and course materials to you or instruct you how to obtain them.
      8. Ongoing Student Support—The Indiana College Network provides personal assistance and support to ICN students, as well as a variety of online resources to help distance learners succeed.

Questions? Contact your campus coordinator or ICN staff for assistance.