A variety of individuals and campus offices are involved in the processing of a learner's request to enroll in classes through the ICN Home Insitution Model. Those roles and the associated responsibilities follow.

A variety of individuals and campus offices are involved in the processing of a learner's request to enroll in classes through the ICN Home Insitution Model. Those roles and the associated responsibilities follow.

ICN Campus Coordinator

All college and university campuses that list distance education classes and/or programs with ICN have an ICN Coordinator (Campus Coordinator) whose office provides one-stop service for distance learners. Below are some general activities and expectations for individuals filling this role. This document does not prescribe how individual institutions may fill this role, rather it suggests how this role is perceived by other coordinators throughout the state.

The ICN Coordinator:
• is the primary ICN contact at each campus, overseeing the distant learner’s interaction with the following campus offices: admissions, advising, orientation, registrar, financial aid, and bursar.
• establishes contacts and seeks information from other student offices: library, bookstore, disabilities, and other student services offices on campus may need to contact instructors and staff in other campus offices to resolve a student’s question, establish transferability of courses from one campus to another, or plan a path for grade reporting at the end of the course.
• works cooperatively with other ICN Coordinator to assist students (Home and Originating Institutions).
• is able to discuss all the distance programs of your university or college.
• lets existing distance programs on your campus, particularly graduate programs, know you may be getting phone calls for them, and work out arrangements for hand offs.
• ensures that students receive class materials and tests in a timely fashion, and suggest changes for improvement.
• suggests campus offices, faculty, and staff who should know about the Indiana College Network, and work with ICN personnel to make sure materials are sent.
• gets to know other university or college staff working with distance students and maintains a dialogue throughout the semester. Ongoing communication improves on-campus services.
• recognizes when the work becomes too overwhelming in light of your other duties and trains other staff to work with students taking distance courses, or seeks assistance from your IPSE representative.
• attends ICN Meetings or keeps up by reading meeting minutes, email messages, and the At-A-Distance e-newsletter.
• makes your voice heard to make improvements for distance students.
• posts messages to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with class closings, cancellations, and new classes and programs.
• practices civility with all Coordinators who seek answers on a student’s behalf.

One-stop service: The role reflects the goal of all ICN student transactions
Convenience and accessibility are key to the student’s satisfaction with distance education classes and programs. This requires all Coordinators to have answers at their fingertips or know where to look. For example, when forwarding a call, the ICN Coordinator stays on the line with the student until a live person with an answer handles the question. When forwarding an email, the ICN Coordinator copies the student. The ICN Coordinator also makes sure that students know his/her name, phone number, and/or email address before concluding a call or email. And lastly, the ICN Coordinator follows up with students to make sure their needs are met.

REMEMBER: The student’s initial call or email is in lieu of an on-campus visit, so be a friendly open door for your institution. It can make the difference in an additional enrollment and may be the turning point in an adult’s life!

Qualities of an Effective ICN Coordinator

Who can fulfill this role?

An effective ICN Coordinator:

  • is optimistic.
  • learns new information quickly and easily.
  • adapts to changing circumstances with flexibility and a sense of humor.
  • practices good organizational and scheduling skills
  • advocates on the student’s behalf with awareness of nontraditional students’ complex lives.
  • advocates on behalf of ICN institutions for students prepared for success and the integrity of college and university programs.
  • seeks answers creatively with ICN and IHETS staff help.
  • looks beyond ICN for other postsecondary opportunities if necessary.
  • knows the community he or she serves and speaks up for its needs.
  • markets distance education programs.
  • shares.
  • has a fund of experience in education, adult education, training, marketing, and customer service.
  • is a can-do, high-energy, achievement-oriented representative who understands the mission.

Campus Learning Center Coordinator

Campuses with learning centers may also have an On-Campus Learning Center Coordinator.

  • Know how to turn equipment on and troubleshoot technology problems or know who to turn to for technology assistance.
  • Make sure someone is always available for student assistance and support.
  • Become familiar with classes that students take so that you can plan for test proctoring or unusual arrangements with class activities.
  • Work closely with your ICN Coordinator to keep everyone informed about your work with students.
  • Suggest improvements.
  • Attend ICN Meetings or keep up by reading meeting minutes, email messages, and the At-A-Distance e-newsletter. Make your voice heard to make improvements for distance students.
  • Post messages to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with class closings, cancellations, and new classes and programs.
  • Practice civility with all Coordinators who seek answers on a student’s behalf. You may need their assistance in the future.
  • Turn over difficult interinstitutional problems to the ICN Manager of Student Services for assistance.

Off-Campus Learning Center Coordinator

The Learning Center coordinator off-campus will:

  • Read carefully the duties of on-campus coordinators and expect that professional level of service.
  • Read the ICN class schedule carefully and ask questions of campus coordinators or review the Web sites of special programs.
  • Gather as many publications of IHETS, the student services center, and ICPAC as you can to provide your first-time students with assistance.
  • Find resources for nontraditional students because many of your students will be new to college.
  • Work with other off-campus coordinators and the student services center audience development staff to help you develop interesting marketing ideas that will attract students.
  • Study your community for new audiences and find students who are interested in degree completion.
  • Search your community for additional resources such as community education, adult education programs, continuing education programs, retired teachers who can serve as mentors or tutors to your nontraditional students, and public library resources your students can use.
  • Be honest with new students. Don’t promise them something the institutions cannot deliver. Caution students that you and your backups of other coordinators, student services center staff, and the Learning Center coordinator will do what can be done in the student’s best interests.
  • Don’t take no the first time; always seek an answer from the campus coordinator or your backup team (see above). If a response doesn’t make sense to you, keep asking for answers until you can explain the situation to the student.
  • Attend meetings of the coordinators or keep up with all meeting minutes and messages. Make your voice heard to make improvements for distance students.
  • Post messages to the This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. with class closings, cancellations, and new classes added after the ICN schedule is published.
  • Practice civility with all coordinators who seek answers on a student’s behalf. You may need their assistance in the future. It’s always wise to remember that you already know enough to qualify for your job!